About

the young and evilI am beginning this blog in conjunction with the M.A. thesis I am currently writing on Charles Henri Ford and Parker Tyler’s The Young and Evil (1933), not only one of the great literary achievements of queer modernism, but a text that remains, rather inexplicably, largely unknown.

At present, I have two overriding intentions for this blog. The first is to serve as a record of my thesis research process, an archive of material and information that I am studying, considering, and feel like I need to know but which will not ultimately make it into my thesis (though who knows, maybe some of it will!).

The other reason is that I suffer from what Elaine Freedgood and Cannon Schmitt have recently referred to as “an overactive research imagination.”  I derive endless pleasure from the research process, and I am the kind of person that an unfamiliar name or a striking image can trip an extended research jag. I figure it’s time to channel these impulses into something more immediately and tangibly productive.

Furthermore, I have realized that many of the figures, texts, and other cultural material associated with queer modernism that I am interested in continue to have a very marginal (sometimes even nonexistent) internet presence, making even basic information hard to come by. This is a situation I hope to play some role in beginning to rectify.

Some writing–such as reviews–are inevitably subjective in nature, but my goal is that all information posted here adheres to the high academic standards within the Humanities, and I follow the MLA guidelines for all citations.

INFORMATION:

Jesse Ataide
San Francisco State University
Personal email: jataide@mail.sfsu.edu
Website email: queer.modernists@gmail.com

2 thoughts on “About

  1. you inspire me.
    “I derive endless pleasure from the research process, and I am the kind of person that an unfamiliar name or a striking image can trip an extended research jag. I figure it’s time to channel these impulses into something more immediately and tangibly productive.”
    we are kindred souls.

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